HJS This Week on Sinai crash, surveillance and Turkey

By HJS

As we look out of the window, the fog over Westminster may provide a suitable metaphor for the long-awaited legislation on online surveillance.

Will the Investigatory Powers Bill emerge through the Parliamentary process to see the light of day? That depends on whether lawmakers feels there is adequate judicial jurisdiction for how much information authorities can access. The debate will be an interesting one, The Henry Jackson Society experts are at hand to provide comment and analyse on this and all the weeks’ top stories:

Dr Alan Mendoza, Executive Director on surveillance

“The Investigatory Powers Bill is an inevitable response to the way that our national security is now being threatened. It would be comforting to think terrorists don’t use the internet or social media to learn about terrorism and to plot about atrocities, but unfortunately they do. As long as adequate judicial jurisdiction is set for how such information can be accessed by the relevant authorities, this bill should be welcomed by every law abiding citizen of the UK because it will make them safer.”

Hannah Stuart, Research Fellow on Extremism

Hannah is continuing her work in Islamism-inspired terrorism in the UK and is available to comment on counter-extremism and radicalisation-related issues.

Tom Wilson, Resident Associate Fellow on Turkey

“The return of President Erdogan’s AKP to a majority in the Turkish elections should give cause for concern regarding the condition of human rights and civil liberties in that country. Recent unrest and a series of major terror attacks in Turkey may contribute to further instability.”

Dr Andrew Foxall, Director, Russia Studies Centre

“As Egyptian and international experts begin their investigation into why a Russian airliner crashed in the Sinai Peninsula, Russia is presented with the opportunity to work productively with the West to find out what caused the disaster. Moscow lacks any international good will, but will now learn why it’s important not to lose friends and alienate people”.

Emily Dyer, Research Fellow on Women’s Rights

Emily is available to comment on women’s rights and civil liberties issues, particularly with elections taking place in Burma this weekend which could provide a watershed moment for the country’s transition to full democracy.

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