WHAT WOULD CHINESE HEGEMONY IN ASIA LOOK LIKE?

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WHAT WOULD CHINESE HEGEMONY IN ASIA LOOK LIKE?

21st November 2017 @ 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm

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Jennifer Lind

Across the world, countries are pondering how to react to China’s rise.

Japan has so far reacted with great restraint to the emergence of an unfriendly great power next door. In other countries (e.g., Australia, the Philippines, South Korea, and Thailand), influential leaders highlight the dangers of alignment with the United States and favour accommodation of their economically and militarily powerful neighbour. They argue that because China benefits from the current liberal order, Beijing would have no incentive to change it as it grows more powerful. As countries contemplate what costs are worth paying as they react to China’s rise, it’s important to ask, what would it be like to live in “China’s Asia?” To shed light on this, Jennifer Lind analyses previous cases of regional hegemony (e.g., Japan’s East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere; the United States in Latin America; the Soviet “near abroad”); analyses the likely character of Chinese regional hegemony; and draws implications for Britain and other liberal countries around the world.

The Henry Jackson Society is delighted to invite you to an event with Author and Academic, Professor Jennifer Lind for a discussion on the international reaction to China’s rise.

Jennifer Lind is Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College and a Faculty Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University. For Fall 2017 she is a Research Fellow in the Department of Politics at the School for Oriental and African Studies, University of London (SOAS). Lind holds a Ph.D. in Political Science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a Master’s in International Affairs from the University of California, San Diego, and a B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley.

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EVENT SUMMARY

On the 21st of November 2017, the Henry Jackson Society hosted Professor Jennifer Lind in an event titled: “What would Chinese Hegemony in Asia look like?”. Jennifer Lind is an Associate Professor in the Department of Government at Dartmouth College and a Faculty Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University. Currently, she is a visiting Research Fellow in the Department of Politics at the School for Oriental and African Studies, University of London (SOAS).

To start off the event, Jennifer presented the if-conditional question: what if China became the regional supreme in Pacific Asia and briefly addressed other countries in the region, particularly Japan, South Korea and Australia and their current standing towards China. Furthermore, she mentioned her concern over the balance of power, particular if the United States decide to interact less in the region. As it stands, the US is the strongest country in the region – however, given the trajectory of the past 25 years, China is catching up rapidly and no other country can balance their rise in becoming a potential regional hegemon.

Before continuing to assess the current situation and give a look into the future, Jennifer introduced us to previous examples of regional hegemony and given concept in general. The examples given were the USSR in eastern European countries as well as the United States in Latin America. It was interesting to hear the comparison of these two cases and how both regional hegemons were able to advance their own interests with a variety of tools: economic, political, military and cultural.

Following these two examples, the talk focused again on China and whether it has the ability to use given tools and if so, whether it has done so already. In terms of economic tools, Jennifer presented some cases where China has created certain trade deals and has also used some economic coercion in order to exert pressure onto other regional countries. In particular the case with trade agreements can lead to a dependency on the regional hegemon and would thus enable it to further make use of its status. China has certainly become a military superpower, with no other country in the region being able to balance it. In terms of political tools, the launch of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) in 2014, following an initiative by the Chinese government with its headquarters in Beijing, is a prime example as to how China could establish itself as a regional hegemon. Even the use of soft powers, often through cultural tools, is something which China has been engaged in – particularly through the use of media outlets as well as film. Above examples show that China has the ability to become a regional hegemon and is already acting in some parts like one. It was interesting to hear that it follows a similar playbook to above mentioned regional hegemons.

Jennifer then concluded her talk with stating that it depends on other countries, in particular Japan, to decide what they think about the possibility of China establishing itself as a regional hegemon. She mentioned that currently Japan has a very small percentage of GDP spend on its defence. If Japan does feel threatened, it ought to increase that percentage and potentially collaborate with other regional countries to balance the power of China. Whilst this might come at a high cost, the other countries in the region have to ask themselves whether they believe this cost to be worthwhile or rather live in a Chinese Asia.

Jennifer Lind introduced us to a highly interesting thought experiment, which very possibly might become reality in the next five to ten years. She provided a stimulating insight into how regional hegemons gain power and influence and whether China has been following this trend. The Henry Jackson Society would like to thank Professor Jennifer Lind for her presentation on: “What would Chinese Hegemony in Asia look like?”.

Details

Date:
21st November 2017
Time:
5:00 pm - 6:00 pm
Event Tags:
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Venue

Millbank Tower
21-24 Millbank
Westminster, SW1P 4RS United Kingdom
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Other

SPEAKER
Professor Jennifer Lind, Associate Professor at the Department of Government, Dartmouth College and Faculty Associate at the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University

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