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Category Archives: RSC Editorial

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August 3, 2017

Forget Ukraine, Britain is at the heart of Russia’s new Arctic showdown with the West

By Dr. Andrew Foxall

The world is not short of hotspots: Syria; North Korea; Libya; Ukraine … But one of the hottest is also one of the coldest – the Arctic, which is rapidly becoming the front line in a new …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, RSC News Coverage, Russia | Tagged , ,
July 24, 2017

Russia Is Testing NATO in the Skies

By Andrew Foxall
Last month, a Russian jet flew within five feet of a U.S. reconnaissance plane near the Baltic Sea. According to U.S. officials, the Russian Su-27 “rapidly” approached the U.S. RC-135 plane and acted “provocatively” by performing “unsafe” maneuvers. Russia’s Defense …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, RSC News Coverage, Russia | Tagged , ,
January 10, 2017

Romania’s corruption fight is a smokescreen to weaken its democracy

Originally published in the Guardian.
by David Clark
The recent rise of the populist right in Hungary and Poland has raised the alarm about the future of democracy in Europe, as constitutional safeguards, media pluralism and civil society come under sustained attack.
But …

Posted in Media Centre, News Coverage, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, RSC News Coverage, Spotlight
December 14, 2016

Putin’s Paradise: What If Russia Had Chosen Prosperity When the USSR Collapsed?

Originally published in Heat Street
Twenty-five years ago, in December 1991, the Soviet Union fragmented, ending the Cold War. Today, Russia and the West seem again set on an intractable conflict. Here Dr Andrew Foxall, an academic and Russia expert, imagines how …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial
December 8, 2016

Putin will never restore Russia’s greatness

Originally published in CapX
Twenty five years ago, on 8 December 1991, the leaders of Belarus, Russia, and Ukraine signed the Belavezha Accords, an agreement that dissolved the Soviet Union.
Fewer than two weeks afterwards, leaders from all but one of the …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial
October 14, 2016

Now Russia’s Grip on UK Politics Is Obvious. But It’s Always Been There

Originally published by Heat Street
On Tuesday, Boris Johnson raised more than a few eyebrows when he called for “demonstrations” to take place outside Russia’s embassy in response to the Kremlin’s war crimes in Syria.
But the Foreign Secretary’s comments were soon overshadowed …

Posted in Defence, Democracy & Development, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Syria, Terrorism & Security, United Kingdom, United States
October 12, 2016

If Stop The War wants peace, why does it indulge Russia’s wars?

Originally published by New Statesman
Wednesday’s House of Commons debate on Aleppo achieved little with regards to the establishment of no-fly zone over the besieged Syrian city, but it was notable for the foreign secretary’s call for “demonstrations” to take place outside Russia’s …

Posted in Defence, Democracy & Development, Human Rights, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Syria, United Kingdom
July 13, 2016

Why Putin Loves Brexit

This Article Originally Appeared in The New York Times
Britain’s referendum decision last month to leave the European Union has plunged Europe into crisis. There will be institutional and political upheaval for years to come while the terms of Britain’s knotty disentanglement …

Posted in European Union, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia
January 22, 2016

The Kremlin’s Western Lawyers

Originally published in the American Interest
In Syria, as in Ukraine and Georgia before, Russia is using warfare to achieve its goals, operating through brute force and fear. In the West, it uses lawfare, exploiting the rule of law to launch …

Posted in RSC Editorial, Spotlight, The Square

The Russian State of Murder Under Putin

Originally published in the Wall Street Journal
On Thursday, a British inquiry into the polonium poisoning death of former Russian agent Alexander Litvinenko in 2006 implicated Russian President Vladimir Putin in the murder. The announcement was the first step toward justice …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia
December 17, 2015

Stick to Sanctions on Russia

Originally published in The New York Times
Ukraine and Russia are still at war. Since the Minsk II peace agreement came into effect on Feb. 15, nearly 400 Ukrainian soldiers and more than 200 civilians have been killed. Many more may …

Posted in Defence, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, RSC News Coverage, Russia, The Square, Ukraine
December 7, 2015

To See Syria’s Future, Look at Chechnya

Originally published in the American Interest.
Putin has tried turning a civil war into a counter-terrorism operation before. It’s unlikely to work out so well for him this time.
Having established Russia’s ability to project its military might in the Middle East …

Posted in ISIS, Islamism, Middle East, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, RSC News Coverage, Russia, Syria
September 18, 2015

Putin’s Clampdown on Art, Film, and Dissent

Over a year and a half has passed since Russia annexed the Crimean peninsula from Ukraine. Since then, Russia has waged a campaign of aggression against Kiev and, despite Western economic and political pressure on Moscow, Moscow has not changed …

Posted in Human Rights, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia
September 14, 2015

Don’t Trust Putin on Syria

Syria is being destroyed. The civil war, now more than four years old, has left the country in ruins. The implacable Islamic State controls vast areas of the north and east, and the barbaric regime of President Bashar al-Assad maintains its Damascus …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Russia Studies Centre
July 16, 2015

The Truth About Flight MH17

Originally published in the Wall Street Journal
One year ago Friday, Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was destroyed over eastern Ukraine while on a scheduled flight from Amsterdam to Kuala Lumpur. All 298 people on board were killed.
Overwhelming evidence suggests that the …

Posted in Media Centre, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia Studies Centre
April 13, 2015

Now the Czechs Have an Oligarch Problem, Too

Originally published in Foreign Policy
Czech oligarch Andrej Babis, his country’s second-richest man and one of the most politically powerful billionaires in the world, is expanding his business empire into Prague’s corridors of power.
Babis currently serves as finance minister, but his ambitions are far grander. The …

Posted in Democracy & Development, Media, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Spotlight
March 24, 2015

To See Ukraine’s Future, Recall Crimea

Originally published in The New York Times
Just over a year ago, Russia annexed Crimea in the first major land grab in Europe since World War II. The world has paid little attention to Crimea since then, but developments on the …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Ukraine
March 18, 2015

How did Russia’s RNCB avoid Ukraine-related sanctions for so long?

Originally published in the Financial Times
Unwilling to go to war with Russia, the west’s main levers for persuading Vladimir Putin to back down over Ukraine are economic sanctions. Their importance was underscored last week, when the US announced new measures …

Posted in Economy, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, RSC Spotlight, Russia, Spotlight, Ukraine
February 9, 2015

The Woman Who Would Take On Vladimir Putin

Originally posted in the Wall Street Journal

Abducted and imprisoned in the same jail where Sergei Magnitsky was killed, this Ukrainian MP and former military pilot has been on a hunger strike for eight weeks.
On Saturday, Nadiya Savchenko began the eighth …

Posted in Human Rights, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Spotlight, Ukraine
January 29, 2015

Director’s Commentary: The Litvinenko Inquiry

Dr Andrew Foxall, Director of the Russia Studies Centre at The Henry Jackson Society, provides commentary on the inquiry into the death of Alexander Litvinenko.
The long-awaited public inquiry into the death, in November 2006, of the Russian dissident Alexander Litvinenko …

Posted in RSC Editorial, Russia Studies Centre, Spotlight
January 21, 2015

Are Russia’s Black Widows Spreading?

Originally posted in World Affairs
Obscured by the attacks in Paris a day later, the January 6th suicide bomb attack in Istanbul was nonetheless a significant one. It was not the first terrorist attack to be carried out by a Russian …

Posted in Extremism, Opinion Editorial, Religious Fundamentalism, RSC Editorial, Russia, Spotlight, Terrorism & Security
November 16, 2014

Crimea, Chechnya and Putin’s Double Standards

Originally published in The Moscow Times
‘In his speech at last month’s annual Valdai Club meeting, President Vladimir Putin accused the West of “double standards” in Ukraine. This is nothing new. Putin has habitually spoken of the West’s double standards since he first came to power.
Those wishing to understand …

Posted in Democracy & Development, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Russia Studies Centre, Spotlight, Ukraine
October 7, 2014

Chechnya, Russia’s Forgotten War

Originally published in World Affairs
Fifteen years ago last week, Russia went to war in Chechnya for the second time in five years. “The collapse of the Soviet Union ends in Grozny,” declared the recently appointed and little-known Russian prime minister, Vladimir Putin. …

Posted in Defence, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Russia Studies Centre, Spotlight
August 17, 2014

It’s not all going well for Putin – whatever you may read to the contrary

Originally published in Conservative Home
‘It was all going so well for Vladimir Putin. At the beginning of July, the Russian President was in the driver’s seat. The European Union was divided over whether to impose tougher economic sanctions against Moscow, …

Posted in Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Spotlight
August 5, 2014

Russia’s response to western sanctions

Originally published in Financial Times
‘The “stage three” sanctions announced by the US and the European Union against Russia last week are designed to bring about change in President Vladimir Putin’s behaviour by targeting Russia where it is most vulnerable – …

Posted in Economy, Opinion Editorial, RSC Editorial, Russia, Spotlight
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