Support the
Henry Jackson
Society

Our work is only possible through the generosity of private philanthropy. Find out how you can support our mission and can contribute to our work.

Members' log in
Event
July 8, 2015

‘The Golden Dawn’s ‘Nationalist Solution’: Explaining the Rise of the Far Right in Greece’

by
Henry Jackson Society

Vasilopoulou.Halikiopoulou

SPEAKERS: 

Dr Sofia Vasilopoulou

Lecturer in the Department of Politics

University of York

Dr Daphne Halikiopoulou

Associate Professor in Comparative Politics

University of Reading

TIME: 1 – 2pm, Wednesday 8th July 2015

VENUE: Meeting Room O, Portcullis House, House of Commons, London SW1A 2LW

To attend please RSVP to: researchassistant6@henryjacksonsociety.org       

#HJSEvents

The fall of fascist regimes in the years following the end of the Second World War marked the delegitimisation of right-wing extremism across Europe. Increasingly, the far-right parties which are successful in Europe are those that have been able to modernise their ideology, framing the debate in terms of civic principles such as democracy, citizenship and respect for the rule of law.

In Greece in particular fascist ideals have been unthinkable, not least because of the memory of the Nazi invasion in the 1940s, and the atrocities and deprivation that followed, as well as the country’s own experience of military dictatorship in the 1960s and 1970s. And yet in May and June 2012, over 400,000 Greek citizens voted for a party that represents precisely those ideals that are so vilified in Greece. What explains the dramatic rise of the extreme, ultranationalist Golden Dawn in a country that has experienced Nazi invasion and a military dictatorship?

By kind invitation of Derek Twigg MP, The Henry Jackson Society is pleased to invite you to a panel discussion with Dr Sofia Vasilopoulou, Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of York, and Dr Daphne Halikiopoulou, Associate Professor in Comparative Politics at the University of Reading. The speakers will discuss their new book, The Golden Dawn’s ‘Nationalist Solution’: Explaining the Rise of the Far Right in Greece, placing the rise of the Golden Dawn in the context of the Eurozone crisis. Looking beyond economic malaise as the sole reason for the rise of ultranationalist rhetoric in the Greek society and politics, they will argue that the success of the Golden Dawn is dependent on the extent to which it was able to propound plausible solutions to the three sets of crises – economic, political and ideological – that culminated in an overall crisis of democracy in Greece.

Biographies

Dr Sofia Vasilopoulou is Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of York, United Kingdom. Her work examines the theme of political dissatisfaction with democracy and democratic institutions across Europe. She is co-editor of Nationalism and Globalisation: Conflicting or Complementary (Routledge 2011 with Daphne Halikiopoulou); and co-author of The Golden Dawn’s Nationalist Solution: Explaining the Rise of the Far Right in Greece (Palgrave 2015 with Daphne Halikiopoulou).

Dr Daphne Halikiopoulou is Associate Professor in Comparative Politics at the Department of Politics and IR, University of Reading.  Her work focuses on nationalism and party competition in Europe. She is mostly interested in right-wing extremism and the politics of exclusion. She is author of Patterns of Secularization: Church, State and Nation in Greece and the Republic of Ireland (Ashgate 2011); co- editor of Nationalism and Globalisation: Conflicting or Complementary (Routledge 2011 with Sofia Vasilopoulou); and co-author of The Golden Dawn’s Nationalist Solution: Explaining the Rise of the Far Right in Greece (Palgrave 2015 with Sofia Vasilopoulou).